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1
Morning Prayer
Pharoah Sanders
09:10
2
Hum Allah Hum Allah Hum Allah
Pharoah Sanders
15:07
3
Journey In Satchidananda
Alice Coltrane, Pharoah Sanders
06:36
4
Blue Moses - Instrumental
Randy Weston
12:00
5
Love Is Everywhere
Pharoah Sanders
05:18
6
Memories Of Lee Morgan
Pharoah Sanders
05:36
7
Greeting To Saud (Brother McCoy Tyner)
Pharoah Sanders
04:07
8
It's Easy to Remember
Pharoah Sanders Quartet
05:04
9
You've Got To Have Freedom
Pharoah Sanders
10:06
10
The Voice of Pan
Sun Ra, Pharoah Sanders, Black Harold
05:17
11
Astral Traveling
Pharoah Sanders
05:50
12
Pharoah's Song
Kahil El'Zabar's Ritual Trio, Pharoah Sanders
11:42
13
Kulu Sé Mama (Juno Sé Mama)
John Coltrane
18:49
14
Our Roots (Began In Africa)
Pharoah Sanders
10:23
15
Gwotet (feat. Pharoah Sanders)
David Murray, Gwo Ka Masters, Pharoah Sanders
12:14
16
Kazuko - Instrumental
Pharoah Sanders
10:15
17
Thembi
Pharoah Sanders
07:04
18
Upper Egypt & Lower Egypt - Medley
Pharoah Sanders
16:18
19
The Thing - 2005 Remaster
Don Cherry
05:50
20
Yanini
Bheki Mseleku
11:07
21
This One's For Trane
Phil Ranelin
08:42
22
Naima
Pharoah Sanders
06:07
23
Moon Child
Pharoah Sanders, William Henderson, Stafford James, Eddie Moore, Cheikh Tidiane Fale
08:10
24
As You Are (feat. Phyllis Hyman)
Pharoah Sanders, Phyllis Hyman
05:08
25
Midnight In Berkeley Square - Instrumental
Pharoah Sanders
09:17
26
The Creator Has A Master Plan
Pharoah Sanders
32:45

Pharoah Sanders

From spiritual jazz to deep improvisations, a trippy evocation of the creator who had a masterplan.
 

Many still see him as no more than one of John Coltrane’s faithful followers. However, the musician who’d come to be nicknamed ‘Little Rock’ (after his hometown in Arkansas where he was born on 13th October 1940) was able to transcend his teacher and create his own unique sound. A saxophone chorus, a distinctive cry, both rustic and lyrical. This evangelist of free jazz left an indelible mark on the face of Great Black music. ‘The Creator has a masterplan, peace and love for every men…’.

Celebrated by followers of esoteric jazz, considered a heretic in the sacrosanct temples of jazz orthodoxy, Pharoah Sanders conjures up everything that the African American music tradition had to offer. He cut his teeth on it all: a pupil of big band, he also played blues, rhythm’n’blues, and bebop, before moving onto ‘new thing’. At the turn of the 1960s he became an apostle of free jazz, playing with masters of the Sun Ra and Don Cherry style, and releasing his first record on the label ESP. He also began to accompany Coltrane, playing on his record Ascension in 1965.

It was around this time that our pharaonic tenor began to make records for Impulse! under his stage name. Tauhid, Karma, Black Unity, Jewels of Thought, Elevation – these titles tell us exactly what his quest is about. Spiritual forces and a universal sound are key, with Pharoah Sanders seeking only to communicate via supreme love, a theme that dwells in many of his compositions. Love is everywhere! His divine message hasn’t deviated since the 1980s when he shifted into a more disco-funk territory.  It’s a real shame that we’re not able to give you a taste of this aspect of his sound with the album Journey to the One – a record long misinterpreted by the guardians of tradition. Yet its all there, radiating beauty, even down to the voice of a very young Bobby McFerrin who appears on this album as a sideman. 

Since then the saxophonist has continued on this path, going through the classics, honouring Coltrane’s messianic memory, and rediscovering rhythms from before the deportation of slaves, such as with the syncretism found in the sounds of healing Gnaoua musicians. “Our Roots Began in Africa”, he proclaimed in the mid 1990s on Message From Home. This is also why we find him playing alongside the South African pianist Bheki Mseleku, and later on with the Guadeloupian Gwo Ka Masters, whose drums beat out the call of the ancients. Pharaoh, the everlasting spirit of the ancestors.

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