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1
Manha de Carnaval - Eurydice - From "Orfeu Negro"
Antônio Carlos Jobim
02:54
2
Warm My Soul (with Courtney John)
Blundetto
04:03
3
Le minimum
Jacques Higelin
05:32
4
Unknown
Ali Nuur
05:20
5
No,no,no - You Don't Love Me- No, No, No
Dawn Penn
03:44
6
Cucurrucucu Paloma - Digitally Remastered
Lola Beltrán
03:24
7
Cristo Redentor - Remastered
Donald Byrd
05:43
8
Sign 'O' the Times
Prince
05:02
9
É Preciso Dar Um Jeito, Meu Amigo
Erasmo Carlos
03:47
10
Cumbia Sobre el Mar
Quantic, Flowering Inferno
06:17
11
Le troublant témoignage de Paul Martin - Introduction parlée
Paul Martin
04:39
12
La Pata y el Pato
Climaco Sarmiento
02:43
13
Soul Makossa
Manu Dibango
04:27
14
Peanut Vendor
Preservation Hall Jazz Band
03:34
15
Jimmy, Renda-Se
Tom Zé
03:37
16
Psycho Killer - 2005 Remaster
Talking Heads
04:21
17
Na Baixa Do Sapateiro
Wando
03:51
18
Gangsters - 2015 Remaster
The Specials
02:50
19
Mr. Funky samba
Banda Black Rio
03:39
20
Shakalaodé
Wganda Kenya
07:33
21
Zanmi kanmarad
Claudette et Ti Pierre
06:36
22
Sol Clap
Quantic
03:50
23
Tell Everybody - Disco Version
Herbie Hancock
07:48

Summer Evening Vol. 1

It’s cocktail time on the terrace. This selection will give you a neck massage and will slowly make you move your hips.

The party awaits. It’s cocktail time on the terrace, with panoramic views of the sun drenched vineyards. The sun sets over the horizon transforming the skies from a burning orange into deep purple. All generations gather together, the elderly chat while the children tear apart a piñata. The sweet sound of music entices their ears, before it gradually makes them start moving their hips.

As for the playlist:

- Jacques Higelin, a French poet, particularly active in the late ’70s/early ’80s. My parents used to listen to his music a lot, and we saw him live numerous times. When he passed away in the spring of 2018, a part of my childhood had gone away.

- Ali Nuur, of Somalia, brings the Far Eastern sound, with sweet minor chords that remind me of Augustus Pablo.

- Lola Beltran aka “La Grande”, was one of my grandfather’s favourite singers. When I listen to her rancheras, I'm somehow transported into a crowded inter-city Mexican bus. Such melancholy!

- Erasmo Carlos is an enigma. Famously known as a composer for Brazilian pop star Roberto Carlos, he also released three wonderful soul albums under his own name in the early ’70s.

- Quantic’s unique blend of Colombian cumbia and Jamaican dub is a must. At the turn of the century, the Englishman settled down in Colombia, where he played with the legendary Fuentes musicians, learned accordion tricks with Anibal Velasquez and brought the jewel of Nidia Gongora to a universal light.

- Paul Martin was a fictitious name of renowned French actor Jean-Pierre Castaldi, who recounts a time he met an orange-eyed girl… a disco-not-disco UFO of a track.

- Maniiiiii: the Peanut Vendor song, better known as “El Manisero” is a well known classic, presented here in an old-school-New-Orleans style.

- Wganda Kenya was a project of the great Fruko, released by the Colombian Fuentes label. Much like Hi or Stax, Fuentes had their own house band that backed the labels singers (with Fruko on bass and direction). Wganda Kenya was the project dedicated to African music. Their version of Fela’s “Shakara” was such a hit that the “shakalaode” became a style of its own in Colombia.

- Claudette & Ti Pierre were a Haitian duo in the late ’70s/early ’80s. Check Sofrito’s “Tropical Treats Edit” of the tune “Zanmi Camarade”: killer!

- In 1979, Herbie Hancock made a disco version of “Tell Everybody” (originally on the Feets, Don't Fail Me Now album). A dancefloor monster, with a great timbales solo. Coke Escovedo and his 22-year old niece Sheila – later becoming famous with Prince as Sheila E – feature on the album).

By the way, you’ve now travelled around the globe, twice.

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