No results

1
Nova Lisboa
Dino d'Santiago
02:59
2
Bleza
Branko
03:22
3
Calhariz
Rastronaut
02:22
4
Intenso
DJ Firmeza
05:02
5
Faraó
Dotorado Pro
02:54
6
House Musik Dedo
Nídia
03:13
7
Nôs Funaná (feat. PEDRO & Branko) - PEDRO + Branko Na Surra Remix
Dino d'Santiago, PEDRO, Branko
04:21
8
Com Licença
Deejay Telio, Bispo
02:48
9
Bósnia
DJ ADAMM
03:30
10
Tarraxo Everyday
DJ Marfox
05:12
11
Na Quebrada
PEDRO, Rincon Sapiência
02:45
12
Bairro
Wet Bed Gang
04:18
13
Major Stef
iZem
04:00
14
Chora
Pongo
02:56
15
Eu Avisei (feat. Deejay Telio)
Blaya, Deejay Telio
03:06
16
Cafeína
Dj Dadda, Plutónio
03:07
17
Sentimento Safari
Julinho Ksd
03:25
18
Também Sonhar
Slow J, Sara Tavares
03:28
19
Bússola
Nenny
04:32
20
Lhast - jND (feat. 9 Miller)
Lhast, 9 Miller
03:29
21
Difícil Demais
Virgul
03:31
22
Afeto
Mayra Andrade
04:24
23
watch me go
Da Chick
04:26
24
AZUL
Moullinex, Xinobi
05:57
25
Fado Para Esta Noite
Xinobi, Gisela João
07:07
26
Flor de Maracujá
Stereossauro, Camane, Amália Rodrigues
03:26
27
Kodak
DJ Danifox, DJ Lycox
03:24
28
UH UH BALANÇOU [JLZ & LYCOX]
JLZ, DJ Lycox
03:01
29
Talanzele
DJ Nigga Fox
04:06
30
Kismet_tool_8
Rui Da Silva, Batida
06:18

Lisboa

A finger on the pulse of the New Lisbon.

In the last few years, Lisbon’s vivid new music scene has aroused a sudden renewed interest. At last, the “White City” – for its daylight reflecting on the buildings – projects a different image of its music than that of fado, an untouchable and sanctified institution, and gradually vacates the vintage postcard imagery, frozen in a melancholic past. Fado still remains the soul of the city and illuminates the narrow streets of the Alfama district as soon as night falls, however the music of Lisbon is no longer just made up of saudade-fuelled harrowing lament. The emergence of a new daring scene, features uncompromising artists eager to promote cultural blending, is revitalizing the city’s DNA, to my delight. A “Nova Lisboa” (“New Lisbon”) proud of its mixed identity, combining tradition and innovation with no complex, embodied perfectly by Dino d’Santiago and the opening track of this playlist, bearing his name.

This young blood flowing through the narrow streets of Lisbon makes the capital city one of the most exciting musical places in Europe today. Still marked by the stigma of its colonial past, the port city has transformed over the years into an exuberant hotbed of multicultural creativity, combining the influences of the PALOP (Portuguese-speaking African Countries) and South America – via Brazil. During my many walks in different parts of the city, I realised that Lisbon acts as a catalyst at the crossroads of various continents. The Portuguese city is gifted in taking the pulse of its beats not only from the archipelago of Cape Verde, but also from Luanda’s and São Paulo’s warm nights, creating a sonic blend like no other. This is how the sonic identity of “the city of seven hills” was profoundly renewed. It was in 2006, to be precise, that the musical rejuvenation of Lisbon began. This momentum was initiated by Luso-Angolan group Buraka Som Sistema and the release of their debut album, Black Diamond. A super-vitamin concentrate of kuduro, a scandalous Angolan genre whose intense rhythm derived from Miami bass and breakbeat – and as provocative as the sultry Brazilian baile funk. Born in the ghettos of Angola’s capital, Luanda, in the ’90s, then brought over to the suburbs of the Portuguese capital where most of the Angolan diaspora is located, kuduro had to wait for Buraka Som Sistema’s sensational appearance on the scene to finally cross the Tagus river, and resonate in downtown Lisbon’s trendy clubs. 

Since the band went on hiatus in 2016, its most prominent members have since asserted their own style – Branko, Blaya and Pongo – a new guard of artists embracing the fusion of electronic, Afrocentric and Latin sounds. Young producers Pedro, Rastronaut and Dotorado Pro create pumping afro-house for their spiritual father Branko’s label, Enchufada. DJs Marfox, Nigga Fox, Lycox, Nídia, Firmeza push the limits of Afrocentric club music with their avant-garde batida sound on Príncipe Records, the other key label that helped reshape the sound of Lisbon. Neither European, nor African, nor Latin, the music that currently soundtracks the city can be summed up in a single word, so aptly used by its greatest ambassador, eternal wanderer-poet Fernando Pessoa: “disquietness”.

Share