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1
Candela (for Sascha Heeney)
Matthew Bourne
03:45
2
Flute Song
Wildflower
04:40
3
Down Another Road
Graham Collier Music, Harry Beckett, Stan Sulzmann, John Marshall
05:16
4
Rye Lane Shuffle
Moses Boyd
04:26
5
Starless and Bible Black
The Stan Tracey Quartet
03:46
6
Abusey Junction
KOKOROKO
07:09
7
My One and Only Love
James Allsopp Quartet
05:30
8
One Tree Found
Alexander Hawkins
05:29
9
White Magic
John Taylor Trio
05:28
10
Inside the Acorn
Maisha
05:55
11
Colonial Mentality - Live
KOKOROKO, Sheila Maurice-Grey, Richie Seivwright, Cassie Kinoshi, Oscar Laurence, Mutale Chashi, Onome Edgeworth, Ayo Salawu
09:44
12
Blue Mosque
The Don Rendell / Ian Carr Quintet
04:15
13
Nomadology
Ed Jones Quartet
07:32
14
Dawn Lit Metropolis
Ill Considered
04:29
15
Dusk Fire
The Don Rendell / Ian Carr Quintet
12:15
16
Black Pearl
Vibration Black Finger
07:46
17
Metropolis (part1 x)
Mike Westbrook
08:01
18
Mra - Live
Chris McGregor's Brotherhood Of Breath, Harry Beckett, Frank Williams
07:22
19
Church
Mark Kavuma, Mussinghi Brian Edwards, Ruben Fox, Reuben James, Conor Chaplin, Kyle Poole, Michela Marino Lerman
04:37
20
Tonal
Joe Harriott
05:58
21
Ho Ho Country Kicking Blues
Graham Bond
07:57
22
Dewey Square
Jazz Jamaica
04:17
23
Forbidden Fruit
Chris Bowden
06:23
24
Bleydays
Kit Downes
06:27
25
A Symphony of Amaranths: Carillon / Nocturne / Entracte / Impromptu
Neil Ardley
25:07
26
Rashad
Hello Skinny
03:58
27
Another Mad Yak
Olie Brice Quintet
06:18
28
Counting The Ways
Teotima
06:47
29
The Sheikh
Zoe Rahman
03:54
30
What Is Life
The Fiction Trio
04:08

UK Jazz Age

A history of jazz in the UK up to the present trend.

British jazz is enjoying a strong creative surge and there have never been so many exciting groups and musicians making music we can loosely call jazz. The scene draws people from all walks of life and from all around the world – but then musicians have always been travellers.
As jazz made its way around the world (during the Second World War and the years that followed) in the bags of the GI's and airforce men, it found an enthusiastic welcome in many cities around Europe. France, Italy, Germany and Sweden all became home to American musicians such as Mal Waldren and Dextor Gordon, and labels flourished supporting the music. Enja, Black Saint, and Actual are all important names to look for.

In the years following the War, Army bands offered many musicians the best opportunity to develop their skills, and musicians would play the cruise ships to earn their way to hear the famous names in the clubs of New York. The scene was also influenced by the relationship with South Africa and the Caribbean Islands. Chris MacGregors's blue notes have had a lasting effect on a generation of musicians, and many of the current crop of musicians continue to shape the sound through the influence of their caribbean heritage.

This playlist mixes tracks from the music's history in the UK, alongside the creative voices of the present. Classics like Stan Tracey's “Starless and Bible Black” sit comfortably next to modern pianist Matthew Bourne’s solo piano; the Brotherhood of Breath classic “Mra” (sadly a live version, the original is not here yet), is balanced by the energy of Ugandan trumpeter Mark Kavuma's “Church”. It's a varied fare – as you would expect when the music draws on influences from free music, classical, dance music, calypso, carnival, electronica as well as on its own jazz history.

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