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1
Intro
Hellcat
00:08
2
Who Are You?
Union 13
01:43
3
500 Channels
Choking Victim
02:40
4
I Am A Revenant
The Distillers
03:29
5
Barroom Hero
Dropkick Murphys
02:57
6
Nazi White Trash
Leftöver Crack
02:59
7
It's Quite Alright
Rancid
01:29
8
Give 'em The Boot
Roger Miret & The Disasters
02:16
9
Riding The Region
Hepcat
02:47
10
Coma Girl
Joe Strummer & The Mescaleros
03:48
11
No More Misty Days
Buju Banton
02:53
12
To Have And To Have Not
Lars Frederiksen and the Bastards
02:46
13
D.J. D.J.
Transplants
04:01
14
Suburban Blight
F-Minus
00:56
15
Dirty Reggae
The Aggrolites
03:14
16
Who Killed The Cheerleader
Nekromantix
04:09
17
Have The Time
The Slackers
03:05
18
Los Hombres No Lloran
Voodoo Glow Skulls
02:50
19
Open Season
Stubborn All-Stars
03:55
20
Spirit Of The Streets
The Business
01:57
21
Push 'n Shove
Hepcat
03:20
22
The Long Shadow
Joe Strummer & The Mescaleros
03:34
23
Unity
Operation Ivy
02:13
24
Spirit of '87
Rancid
03:22

Hellcat Records

How Tim Armstrong, the lead singer of Rancid and a figurehead of Californian punk, proved to be perfect Artistic Director for Hellcat Records, a subsidiary of Epitaph.

In the late 90s, Brett Gurewitz was somewhat... overwhelmed. The former Bad Religion guitarist, who also owns the Epitaph Records label, had just seen his favorite band fly off to Sony – a blow since The Offspring had just sold more than eleven million copies of Smash, half of which was in the US market alone. The departure of The Offspring from their historic label, Epitaph, would give rise to a serious – and highly publicised – grudge. In addition, the Californian was fighting a nasty polytoxicomania which included crack, heroin and alcohol. In short, at the end of the nineties, Brett Gurewitz was a boss of rich label, but was himself broken.

At this point in the fight, any addictologist would advise a good dose of calm and rest. Brett would do the opposite - and it’s possibly what saved him as he’s been clean since 1999. In 1997 he telephoned another completely unstable punk – Rancid singer Tim Armstrong – in order to create a new label, a subsidiary of Epitaph: Hellcat Records. Ex-Operation Ivy, ex-alcoholic, ex-depressive, ex-homeless, Tim Armstrong is a figurehead of Californian punk, a pure product of the Bay Area, fed by The Clash, the poetry of Jim Carroll, and the riffs of a working class hero such as Billy Bragg. Despite the usual punk shenanigans and the fact that he was just emerging from an acrimonious divorce, Tim Armstrong was the perfect choice for the role of Artistic Director. For nearly ten years, he would scour the underground for rude boys and sign an impressive cohort of decent bands.

Union 13, Choking Victim, Dropkick Murphys, F-Minus, The Distillers, Nekromantix and even the legends of GBH who were signed for their last two albums... Armstrong had plenty of free reign and could sign away. Soon, Hellcat became the extension of its AD’s tattooed head, filled with an impressive mix of ska, punk, oi!, psychobilly, and hardcore.

In 2003, shortly before starting to lose momentum, Hellcat would play one of its last master strokes by releasing Streetcore, a superb third and final posthumous album by Joe Strummer and The Mescaleros. Produced by Rick Rubin, Streetcore contains, amongst other things, a cover of Bob Marley's ‘Redemption Song’, played alongside Johnny Cash. Filmed in New York, the video is  heart-breakingly beautiful, and features many supporters of the label who came out to honour Joe Strummer, the godfather of Hellcat Records.

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