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1
Interview 1
Max Ernst
00:49
2
Max Ernst
Mission Of Burma
03:00
3
A Portrait of V. I. Lenin in the Style of Jackson Pollock, Part 1
The Red Krayola
03:05
4
Jackson Pollock: II. Jackson Pollock Peaks
Morton Feldman, Daniel Stern, Turfan Ensemble
02:35
5
First Take
Ornette Coleman
16:56
6
Rohtko Chapel 1
Morton Feldman
09:06
7
Blues No. 1
Loren Connors
03:17
8
Blues for Pablo
Miles Davis
05:17
9
Pablo et dora
Michel Portal
01:40
10
Picasso
Astor Piazzolla
03:14
11
Pour Pablo Picasso (Live)
Igor Stravinsky, Stefan Harg
00:27
12
The Last Picasso
Neil Diamond
04:24
13
Pablo Picasso
The Modern Lovers
04:21
14
Virginia Plain
Roxy Music
02:58
15
Andy Warhol - 2015 Remaster
David Bowie
03:54
16
Open House
Lou Reed, John Cale
04:17
17
Magritte
John Cale
04:58
18
Rene and Georgette Magritte with Their Dog After the War
Paul Simon
03:43
19
Basquiat on the Draw
Apollo Brown, Skyzoo, Conway, Westside Gunn
04:29
20
Beat Bop - Edit
Rammellzee, K-Rob
06:10
21
Salvador Dali Being an Individual
The Clash
00:41
22
Salvador Dali
Jonathan Richman
02:21
23
His Words - Part 4
Salvador Dalí
03:47
24
Save Me from Dali
Snakefinger
02:31
25
Tal Coat - Remastered 2004
Brian Eno
05:27
26
Music for Marcel Duchamp (1947)
John Cage, Stephen Drury
06:08
27
Yoko Ono, You Were Born Into A Rich, Aristocratic Family In Tokyo. Do You See That In Yourself?
Jan Jelinek
02:11
28
Vive le Douanier Rousseau
Philippe Katerine, Francis et ses peintres
03:28

Modern Art Beats

Tracing the porous lines separating Bowie, Miles Davis and Stravinsky from leading figures in the world of modern art like Picasso, Warhol and Dali.

As Keith Richards once said, ‘a lot of good musicians came out of art school, but not many good artists.’ Lennon, Syd Barrett, Kim Gordon, Marc Bolan, David Byrne… the list of ex-art students who decided to turn their hands to music instead is a long one. It’s therefore not too surprising that they continue finding musical inspiration in modern and postmodern art. Dylan paints. Beefheart and Bowie did too. Bryan Ferry wrote “Virginia Plain” inspired by one of the paintings he’d done as a student. 

The subversive figure of the artist-genius clearly inspires many musicians. What more impressive rock star could there be than Pablo Picasso, whose striped jumper is as iconic as the Ramones’ biker jackets? The painter also had his groupies, many of whom hung about outside his studio doors. As Jonathan Richman sang, ‘well some people try to pick up girls and get called assholes. This never happened to Pablo Picasso.’ Fascinated by his aura, the greatest musicians have paid him tribute: Miles Davis, Michel Portal, Stravinsky, Piazzolla...The same goes for Salvador Dali whose spidery moustache is as legendary as Freddy Mercury’s. Jonathan Richman (again) remembers being guided in his dreams by his paintings, while Snakefinger tried to free himself from Dali’s nightmarish surrealist universe.

The no less famous Andy Warhol conceived of the flies on the cover of The Stone’s album Sticky Fingers as well as the embossed banana for Velvet Underground. Rather like Marcel Duchamp’s aloof persona, the postmodern dandy character embodied by Warhol has had a considerable impact on many musicians. Jackson Pollock, who covered his canvases with dripping paint, represented a creative freedom that naturally resonated with the harmonic freedom advocated by Ornette Coleman. Post-impressionist painter Henri Rousseau also deserves a mention, a painter who depicted exotic and fantastical landscapes. Compagnie Créole sang about him and French singer Philippe Katerine covers the song in a rather skewed rock style.

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