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1
Krautrock - 2006 Digital Remaster
Faust
11:48
2
Krautrock
Conrad Schnitzler
20:08
3
Für immer
NEU!
11:17
4
Abdul Malek
Embryo
03:11
5
Conphära
Klaus Schulze
25:47
6
Die weiße Alm - Remastered
Sergius Golowin
06:09
7
Future Days
CAN
09:30
8
Der Narr - Remastered
Walter Wegmuller
03:55
9
A Meditation Mass Part 4
Yatha Sidhra
07:16
10
Turn Over !
Message
04:01
11
Heiße Lippen
Cluster
02:21
12
Galactic Joke A - Remastered
Cosmic Jokers
07:10
13
Morgengruß
Popol Vuh
02:57
14
Dizzy Dizzy
CAN
05:40
15
Watussi
Harmonia
05:59
16
Phaedra - 1995 Remaster
Tangerine Dream
17:32
17
Kometenmelodie 2 - 2009 Remaster
Kraftwerk
05:31
18
ISI
NEU!
05:06
19
Monza (Rauf und runter)
Harmonia
07:07
20
La Düsseldorf
La Düsseldorf
04:29
21
Rubycon - Pt. 1 / Remastered 2018
Tangerine Dream
17:17
22
Maroubra Bay - 2012 Remaster
Edgar Froese
17:00

Krautrock 1973 - 1975

The second part of ‘krautrock’ – a jokey name given to one of the most fantastic pop music movements of the end of the 20th century.

73, 74, 75...three years of extraordinary creative intensity.

For example, Conrad Schnitzler, the founder of the Zodiak Club in Berlin, recorded something out of this world, a sort of cross between Suicide (though slightly ahead of their time) and an electo Miles Davis; Faust added multiple guitar tracks; NEU! continued their sound exploration, inspired by music from Pakistan and...water (yep seriously). As for Can, they were creating their hypnotic vibe by layering up sounds, and adding a powerful groove to Stockhausen. Embryo stood at the crossroads of multiple influences: percussion, free jazz piano, ‘Arabic’ sounding guitar (King Gizzard and Lizard Wizard owes them a lot!) Having moved on from Tangerine Dream and Ash Ra Tempel, Klaus Schulze went solo, recording dark, Wagnerian electro music.

During this period, hippie psychedelia was omnipresent in West Germany. A Swiss painter named Wegmüller released a concept album based on Tarot cards; Yatha Sidhra recorded improvisations based on the Hindu ragas; and Klaus Schulze created compositions for the words of Sergius Golowin, a sort of Swiss Timothy Leary...

At odds with this ‘mystico-baba-cool’ feeling, Message, from Düsseldorf, was Germany’s answer to Black Sabbath, with some jazz thrown in. But rock was soon to give way to electro. With “Zuckerzeit” Cluster began to sound less chaotic, and began to structure their improvisations using rhythm machines. The resulting music is as novel and profound as what would – following Cluster’s influence – be produced by Aphex Twin decades later. After NEU! broke up, Rother joined Cluster and formed Harmonia. To say that Eno was impressed by them would be a huge understatement. And as for Bowie, he had originally planned to record his album Heroes with them! Klaus Dinger, NEU!’s ex-drummer, joined forces with his brother to form the group L.A. Düsseldorf.

The label Kosmische Musik put together a supergroup made up of the most celebrated musicians on the Berlin scene, and recorded several of their sessions. They went by the name Cosmik Jokers and included Klaus Schulze, Manuel Göttsching, Jürgen Dollase and Harald Großkopf. The only downside to the whole project was that the record label released the recordings without the artists’ consent. The legal proceedings that followed were enough to scare off the man who had orchestrated the whole project, Rolf-Ulrich Kaiser. 

Edgard Froese, the mastermind behind Tangerine Dream would have huge success with his improvised music played entirely on synthesisers. Popol Vuh would abandon electronic sounds completely, and go on to compose deeply lyrical pieces for acoustic instruments. And finally, after three experimental albums, Kraftwerk would have their first international success with Autobahn, going on to become one of the most influential and well known groups of the krautrock genre.
 

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