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1
These Boots Are Made For Walkin'
Nancy Sinatra
02:46
2
Spanish Flea
Herb Alpert & The Tijuana Brass
02:06
3
A Groovy Kind Of Love
Mindbenders
02:00
4
The Sun Ain't Gonna Shine Anymore - Stereo Version
The Walker Brothers
03:14
5
Lightning Strikes (Original Mix)
Lou Christie
02:54
6
Shapes of Things
The Yardbirds
02:25
7
Substitute
The Who
03:47
8
Paint It, Black
The Rolling Stones
03:22
9
Monday, Monday - Single Version
The Mamas & The Papas
03:28
10
Cherish
The Association
03:27
11
The More I See You
Chris Montez
02:43
12
Hey Girl
Small Faces
02:15
13
Paperback Writer - Remastered 2015
The Beatles
02:18
14
Don't Bring Me Down (Bonus Track)
The Animals
03:16
15
Sunny Afternoon - Mono Mix
The Kinks
03:30
16
Eight Miles High
The Byrds
03:34
17
Summer in the City - Remastered
The Lovin' Spoonful
02:40
18
River Deep - Mountain High
Ike & Tina Turner
03:34
19
Getaway
Georgie Fame & The Blue Flames
02:32
20
God Only Knows - Mono / Remastered
The Beach Boys
02:53
21
Eleanor Rigby - Remastered 2009
The Beatles
02:06
22
Got To Get You Into My Life - 2004 Digital Remaster
Cliff Bennett & The Rebel Rousers
02:37
23
Somebody Help Me
The Spencer Davis Group
02:01
24
96 Tears
? & The Mysterians
02:57
25
Holy Cow
Lee Dorsey
02:31
26
Reach Out I'll Be There - Single Version / Mono
Four Tops
02:57
27
You Keep Me Hangin' On
The Supremes
02:43
28
What Becomes Of The Brokenhearted - Single Version
Jimmy Ruffin
03:01
29
Sunshine Superman (2005 Remastered Version) [Mono]
Donovan
03:15
30
Good Vibrations - Remastered
The Beach Boys
03:39

The Hits of 1966

1966 is a watershed year in music history. A huge amount of songs were big sellers on both sides of the Atlantic and somehow still seep into our bones.
 

In 1966 London was swinging and though I was learning to walk and could barely string a sentence together, the music of the day somehow seeped into my bones. Nancy Sinatra, Tijuana Brass, Lou Christie, The Beatles, Kinks, Stones, and Motown – producing music I have loved throughout my life.

What struck me most when researching the year was how many songs were big sellers on both sides of the Atlantic. Only “Cherish” by The Association did nothing in the UK, with “96 Tears” only just grazing the Top 40. “Cherish” remains one of the biggest hits and most radio-played songs in US history. The Association is one of the all-time favourite bands of this writer and their commercial failure in the UK is our loss. Please check them out – 6 vocalists mean exquisite harmonies; sunshine pop at its warmest. On that front, it was the breakthrough year for The Mamas and Papas. Boy, was it tough to choose between “Monday Monday”, “California Dreaming”, “I Saw Her Again” and “Words of Love”.

In January, The Byrds recorded “Eight Miles High”, a mini-masterpiece that blended influences from Ravi Shankar and John Coltrane and can lay claim to be the first psychedelic single. It’s a work of genius that still sounds exhilarating half a century later, and is certainly one of the top handful of songs ever pressed to vinyl, even though guitarist and co-writer Dave Crosby says their earlier version (at the time unreleased) was stronger. What does he know?!

The Beatles and Beach Boys released Revolver and Pet Sounds, unarguably two of the greatest albums of all-time, and get two tracks each on this playlist. How can you pick between “Paperback Writer” and “Eleanor Rigby” or “God Only Knows” and “Good Vibrations”?! The significance of these releases is that they are milestones – perhaps even starting points – on the road to the 33 eventually surpassing the 45 in terms of artistic endeavour and importance. But that is still 2 or 3 years away. At the moment the 7” single is still the boss format for music lovers.

With hindsight, one can see that the pop charts did and didn’t reflect the times. The UK economy was booming, employment rates were high, young people had money in their pockets, and the music is bright, breezy and optimistic. All was not so well Stateside – the Civil Rights Movement, Vietnam, the Texas University shooting, acid, hippies, student riots...the world was about to change, but this was not yet reflected in pop music. The American songs here wear an equally happy face, except perhaps for “River Deep Mountain High”.  Another work of magnificent pop genius that I’ve always felt has something of a dark cloud over it. Something malevolent or foreboding, just a feeling… but Tina, what a voice!

Oh, and did I mention that England won the world cup? In England we never forget this because it is never going to happen again. At least we have The Beatles.
 

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